Protesters organize protests in West Palm Beach in support of the Cuban people on Sunday

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On Sunday, three protests were held in support of the Cuban people across West Palm Beach. A protest began at the intersection of Forest Hill Boulevard and Military Trail at around 7 p.m., exactly one week after a protest was held there on the first day of the demonstrations. “I’m not really sure what would be the best course of action to find the outcome we need, but I know we can’t just sit idly by,” said Ramon Alfonso, who lives in West Palm. Beach. While there weren’t as many protesters at that protest on Sunday as there were a week ago, protesters say it is because some people have been to Washington or Miami, or participated in other events in West Palm Beach throughout the day. since there are people here who show some support, that’s all that matters, ”said Yoslettys Carrion, who lives in West Palm Beach. “We’re not asking for any help with food, medicine or anything,” said Randy Mujica of West Paume Plage. “We ask the United States to help us get a free Cuba. We can help rebuild Cuba again.” We can build business, we can have prosperity, but we want to be free, that’s the only way ‘get the Cuba who we want. “There was also a candlelight vigil held at Jose Marti Park, which began at 7 pm, for the people of Cuba. The vigil consisted of a prayer, a march and a call to action for the US government.” Do something, “said Rick Gonzalez, an organizer of the vigil.” More discussion. Act. It’s been a week. “Earlier today, more than a hundred people gathered in downtown West Palm Beach to stage a demonstration in support of the people of Cuba. Similar protests have taken place. held in Palm Beach County, the Treasure Coast and the state of Florida over the past seven days Protesters say their goal is to motivate the United States government or the United Nations to take action to help ensure freedom of people in Cuba. Protesters gathered at the City Center, which is next to West Palm Beach City Hall, at noon. At around 2:30 p.m., more than 100 protesters marched down Clematis Street to the Intracoastal Waterway and vice versa, temporarily causing police blockades on Clematis Street, Olive Avenue, Datura Street and Dixie Highway, are suffering, ”said Naomi Suarez, organizer of the protest in West Palm Beach, on Sunday. “Please help us. That’s all we can do because we Cubans can’t do it, that’s why I’m calling on Joe Biden to please help our country. “President Biden, we need your help,” said Nerelys Hernandez, a local. demonstrator. “Now is the time. Not tomorrow. Not tomorrow, now! Today is the time!” District 18 Congressman Brian Mast (right) was also in attendance at the protest on Sunday. He says he supports the Cuban people in their quest for freedom. Live video on Facebook of the demonstration in the city center below:

On Sunday, three protests were held in support of the Cuban people across West Palm Beach.

A protest began at the intersection of Forest Hill Boulevard and Military Trail at around 7 p.m., exactly one week after a protest was held there on the first day of the protests.

“Honestly, I don’t know what would be the best solution to find the result that we need, but I know that we cannot sit idly by,” said Ramon Alfonso, who lives in West Palm Beach.

While there weren’t as many protesters at that protest on Sunday as there were a week ago, protesters say it is because some people have been to Washington or Miami, or participated in other events in West Palm Beach throughout the day.

“As long as there are people here who are showing some support, that’s all that matters,” said Yoslettys Carrion, who lives in West Palm Beach.

“We’re not asking for any help in terms of food or medicine or anything,” said Randy Mujica of West Palm Beach. “We ask the United States to help us get a free Cuba. We can help rebuild Cuba again.

“We can create business, we can have prosperity but we want to be free, that’s the only way to get the Cuba we want.”

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This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

A candlelight vigil was also held at Jose Marti Park, which started at 7 p.m., for the Cuban people.

The vigil consisted of a prayer, a walk and a call to action for the US government.

“Do something,” said Rick Gonzalez, an organizer of the vigil. “No more discussion. Take action. It’s been a week.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

Earlier today, more than 100 people gathered in downtown West Palm Beach to demonstrate in support of the Cuban people.

Similar protests have taken place in Palm Beach County, the Treasure Coast and the state of Florida over the past seven days

The protesters say their goal is to motivate the United States government or the United Nations to take action to help guarantee the freedom of Cubans.

Protesters gathered at the City Center, which adjoins West Palm Beach City Hall, at noon. At around 2:30 p.m., the more than 100 protesters marched down Clematis Street to the Intracoastal Waterway and back, causing temporary police blockades on Clematis Street, Olive Avenue, Datura Street and Dixie Highway.

“We are suffering,” said Naomi Suarez, organizer of the protest in West Palm Beach, on Sunday. “Please help us. That’s all we can do because we Cubans can’t do that, that’s why I’m calling on Joe Biden to help our country, please. pleases.

“President Biden, we need your help,” said Nerelys Hernandez, a local protester. “Now is the time. Not tomorrow. Not tomorrow, now! Today is the time!”

Congressman Brian Mast (R) District 18 was also present at the protest on Sunday. He says he supports the Cuban people in their quest for freedom.

Live video on Facebook of the demonstration downtown below:

This content is imported from Facebook. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.



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